Herbs

This is the category for all fresh herbs.

Showing all 14 results

  • Basil

    The word basil comes from the Greek βασιλεύς (basileus), meaning "royal". This is because it is believed to have grown above the spot where St. Constantine and Helen discovered the Holy Cross. The Oxford English Dictionary quotes speculations that basil may have been used in "some royal unguent, bath, or medicine". Basil is still considered the "king of herbs" by many cookery authors. An alternative etymology has "basil" coming from the Latin word basilicus, meaning dragon and being the root for basilisk, but this likely was a linguistic reworking of the word as brought from Greece.
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  • Cayenne pepper

    Cayenne pepper is the basis for the hot sauce known as Tabasco, as well as being an ingredient in many other commercially made hot sauces, such as Frank's Red Hot and Cholula.
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  • Chives

    Chives are herbs which are related to the onion. Its leaves are used for flavoring.
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  • Dill

    Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a short-lived annual herb that is often used as a spice, to make food taste better.
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  • Fennel

    Fennel is a kind of herb. It is native to the Mediterranean and some parts of Asia. Its bulb, leaves, and seeds may be eaten. Dried fennel seeds are used as a spice for flavoring food. Fennel was used to make the spiced wine, claret, in the Middle Ages. Their flavor is like anise.
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  • Garlic

    Superstitious people believe that it can be used to keep vampires away. It is used as herbal medicine in the treatment of cold and flu, and has side effects of heart burn, flatulence and sweating. Garlics are divided into many parts called cloves.
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  • Marjoram

    In some middle-eastern countries, marjoram is synonymous with oregano, and there the names sweet marjoram and knotted marjoram are used to distinguish it from other plants.
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  • Mint

    Mentha (mint) is a genus of about 25 species (and many hundreds of varieties) of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae (Mint Family).
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  • Oregano

    The flowers are purple. They can grow 3–4 mm long. The name of the plant comes from the Greek origanon [ὀρίγανον]: oros [ὄρος] “mountain” + the verb gangrenous [γανοῦσθαι] “delight in”.
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  • Parsley

    Parsley needs good, light soil, good drainage and frequent watering to thrive indoors. To harvest parsely, cut the most mature stalks near the base that are still bright green. New shoots will grow for some time from the base of an established plant. Parsley is extraordinarily rich in vitamins C and A, minerals (especially potassium),beta-carotene, folate and dietary fiber. The following chart provides information on the nutritional values and caloric composition of parsley:
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  • Rosemary

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant evergreen needle-like leaves. It is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, which also includes many other herbs.
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  • Sage

    Common sage (Salvia officinalis) is a small evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers that grows in southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. It is much cultivated as a kitchen and medicinal herb, and is also called Garden sage, Kitchen sage, and Dalmatian sage. In southern Europe similar species are sometimes cultivated for the same purpose, and may be confused with the common sage. It likes warm, quite dry soil with some shade but it will grow in almost any garden soil. It can live through winter but after three to five years the plant is past its best and should be replaced.
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  • Tarragon

    Tarragon or dragon's-wort (Artemisia dracunculus L.) is a perennial herb in the family Asteraceae. It is native to a wide area of the Northern Hemisphere from the easternmost parts of Europe to across central and eastern Asia and India, western North America, and south to northern Mexico. Tarragon grows to 120–150 cm tall, with slender branched stems.
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  • Thyme

    Thymus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera insect species including Chionodes distinctella and the Coleophora case-bearers C. lixella, C. niveicostella, C. serpylletorum and C. struella (the last three feed exclusively on Thymus).
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